His Most Famous Painting "Man at the Crossroads" by Diego Rivera

in Painting

In 1932, Nelson Rockefeller commissioned Mexican muralist Diego Rivera to paint a mural for the ground floor lobby of the Radio Corporation Arts Building in the Rockefeller Center. The painting was supposed to depict in Rockefeller's own words "Man at the Crossroads Looking with Hope and High Vision to the Choosing of a New and Better Future." Rivera proposed a 63-foot mural. He started working on the mural with the help of six assistants, in March 1933.

"Man at the Crossroads" proved out to be one of the most groundbreaking works of Diego Rivera. The center of the painting portrayed a commanding industrial worker with his hands on the controls of heavy machinery. The crossroads were formed by two long narrow slides intersecting at the centre, right below the worker. One slide displayed a microscopic view of body cells, reflecting sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and another presented a telescopic view of the universe. The painting was roughly divided into two sections. The left panel showed elite people, especially women, enjoying, drinking, and partying. A contrast was reflected on the same side with a group of people protesting and being clubbed by the police.

The right side of "Man at the Crossroads" showed a May Day parade with workers and people living in harmony. At the center of the left side, there was an image of Vladimir Lenin (Russian communist leader), as if joining hands in power with a black farmer, a white worker, and a soldier. The presence of Lenin in the painting hinted at an 'Anti-Capitalist' flavor. To avoid any kind of political controversy, Nelson Rockefeller requested Rivera to replace the face of Lenin with any ordinary face. Diego was an ardent fan of the Soviet leader and so he refused to replace Lenin in the painting. He instead offered to add American leader Abraham Lincoln's face to another part of the mural. Their differences were never resolved.

Rivera wished to get a few pictures taken of his "Man at the Crossroads," but photographers were banned from the center. Lucienne Bloch, one of Rivera's assistants, snuck in a camera into the building and took some pictures to record the mural. These pictures are the only original records of the mural. On May 22, 1933, Rivera was paid in full and was barred from the premises, without letting him complete his work. The painting was then draped and was hidden away from the public eye. On the midnight of February 9, 1934, a few workers marched into the center with axes and hammers and destroyed the mural.

Diego Rivera was determined to finish his painting "Man at the Crossroads," so he reproduced his work under the name "Man, Controller of The Universe." This painting also depicted Lenin and Rivera added a portrait of Leon Trotsky (another communist leader). This painting can be seen in the Palace of Fine arts in Mexico. At Rockefeller's Center, the mural replacing that of Diego's has Abraham Lincoln as its key subject.

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Annette Labedzki has 1 articles online

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His Most Famous Painting "Man at the Crossroads" by Diego Rivera

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This article was published on 2010/04/03